Indonesië

Informatie- en nieuwsforum over Indonesië en Nederlands-Indië
 
IndexKalenderFAQRegistrerenInloggen

Deel
 

 Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent!

Ga naar beneden 
AuteurBericht
Kesasar

Kesasar

Aantal berichten : 2586
Registratiedatum : 03-01-09
Woonplaats : Selandia Baru

Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent! Empty
BerichtOnderwerp: Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent!   Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent! Icon_minitimewo 2 nov 2011 - 0:56




Police accepted money from Freeport since 2001: ICW reports


The Jakarta Post, Jakarta Tue, 11/01/2011 5:58 PM


The Indonesian Corruption Watch (ICW) has reported payments of security funds by PT Freeport Indonesia to the police from 2001 to 2010 totaling around US$79.1 million.

“The money was basically illegal. Furthermore, the funds can be seen as a bribe because they were given without any legal grounds,” ICW researcher Firdaus Ilyas said Tuesday, as quoted by tribunnews.com.

He said that his team had not investigated whether or not the money had flowed to the police chief, which could then be regarded as a gratuity. However, he was convinced that the money did not go through the Finance Ministry.

National Police chief Gen. Timur Pradopo had previously admitted that police officers in Papua had accepted money from Freeport, which he lightly regarded as mere “pocket money”.

Firdaus, however, said that accepting money from external sources in return for security services was unacceptable for the police, as it was their duty to ensure order and security.

“State institutions are not allowed to accept money from anyone and from any institution or company,” he said.


The Indonesian Corruption Watch (ICW) has reported payments of security funds by PT Freeport Indonesia to the police from 2001 to 2010 totaling around US$79.1 million.

“The money was basically illegal. Furthermore, the funds can be seen as a bribe because they were given without any legal grounds,” ICW researcher Firdaus Ilyas said Tuesday, as quoted by tribunnews.com.

He said that his team had not investigated whether or not the money had flowed to the police chief, which could then be regarded as a gratuity. However, he was convinced that the money did not go through the Finance Ministry.

National Police chief Gen. Timur Pradopo had previously admitted that police officers in Papua had accepted money from Freeport, which he lightly regarded as mere “pocket money”.

Firdaus, however, said that accepting money from external sources in return for security services was unacceptable for the police, as it was their duty to ensure order and security.

“State institutions are not allowed to accept money from anyone and from any institution or company,” he said.




Terug naar boven Ga naar beneden
Kesasar

Kesasar

Aantal berichten : 2586
Registratiedatum : 03-01-09
Woonplaats : Selandia Baru

Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent! Empty
BerichtOnderwerp: Re: Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent!   Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent! Icon_minitimedo 3 nov 2011 - 0:50




Freeport defends right to pay police $14m

The Jakarta Post, Jakarta Wed, 11/02/2011 10:36 AM


Mining giant PT Freeport Indonesia (PT FI) has denied public accusations of graft surrounding the US$14 million the company paid to the National Police to assist its operations in Papua, saying the money had been paid voluntarily.

At a press conference in Jakarta on Tuesday, PT FI spokesman Ramdani Sirait said the funds were legal under the "Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights," an international agreement initiated by several large companies and governments, including the US and the UK.

These principles were signed in December 2000 as guidelines for companies located in conflict areas to secure assets and vital objects by involving local public security officers.

“The cooperation between PT FI and the National Police has followed these principles,” Ramdani said.

Ramdani also said his company had been very transparent on the matter and had allowed the public to freely see the report on its website.

“We are transparent and people can access the annual report about the security money in our website,” he said.

Last year, PT FI paid $14 million for the National Police.

Ramdani said 80 percent of these funds were used to provide supporting facilities, including meals and transportation, while 20 percent was paid in cash.






Terug naar boven Ga naar beneden
 
Oh, I wonder where the money went, into someone's pocket, every cent!
Terug naar boven 
Pagina 1 van 1

Permissies van dit forum:Je mag geen reacties plaatsen in dit subforum
Indonesië :: Berichten :: News in English-
Ga naar: